Category: Leadership

Masterful Use of LinkedIn

I’ve been on LinkedIn for over 10 years and have never seen this before.

Creative Use LinkedIn

This is a classic example of how crafting simple, authentic content can easily distinguish one from the crowd. If the purpose of LinkedIn includes sharing who you are, deepening your relationships, and building your brand, this accomplishes all that and more in one masterful stroke.

Sharing his experiences in this way tells us much about this person:

  1. He’s self-aware, reflecting on his experiences, short-term and long-term.
  2. He’s vulnerable, willing to make those reflections public even if they relate to tough lessons learned.
  3. He’s giving, offering us nuggets of himself that we otherwise would not know. This gift keeps on giving because it also causes us to reflect on our own experiences.
  4. He’s smart yet down to earth, sharing lessons that are simple and pithy and others that are complex and analytical.
  5. He’s humble, proving that he continues to learn no matter how experienced he gets.

Thank you to Phil Nevels for being all these things and more.

The Entrepreneur as Craftsman

It’s not just about the entrepreneur or the startup, it’s about building a great company. It’s about tapping into our basic instinct to do a job well and develop the skills to do so.

Just as a father consistently focuses on doing his job well and keeps trying new techniques to get better. Or a teenager who earned her license and someday must drive in the mountains, through snow, or alongside a caravan of trucks. In each case, the craftsman is dedicated to doing quality work. Continue reading

Think, Act, Communicate

In his book, Start With Why, Simon Sinek shares the idea that great leaders think, act, and communicate based on the Golden Circle.

I’m discovering that Think-Act-Communicate (TAC) is also an effective framework for strategic and tactical planning, particularly for startups and small companies, who don’t need the bloated planning frameworks often used in business. Continue reading

Finding vs. Keeping

Entrepreneurs are naturals at finding. We easily find business opportunities and new markets. We quickly find people who want to work with us by sharing our vision. And if we have the patience, adaptability, and tenacity, we find enough customers to build a business.

But once we make the find, we have a tendency to direct our time, attention, and resources away from it. We often lose interest with the people and organizations who take big risks in buying from us, working with us, investing in us, and partnering with us:  the early adopters who helped us build the foundation of a business. Continue reading

Mom and Pop Startups

The ambitions may have changed but reality hasn’t.

More first-time entrepreneurs have grander plans than those of the past. Gone is the desire to simply create a job for themselves or a small business that employs a few people. Today’s first-timers believe they can build the next Facebook, Starbucks, or Subway, and that’s good. Entrepreneurs need vision, ambition, and BHAGs. There’s nothing we can do – or should do – to temper their energy and enthusiasm. Continue reading

The Co of Co-Working

I often work from a co-working space, know several people who have started, run and invested in them, and know even more who work at them.

From what I’ve seen, heard, read, and experienced, co-working is here to stay. It’s become the new way of officing for mobile and traveling professionals, sole practitioners, and startup founders. Even big companies are retrofitting their facilities to mimic co-working spaces, or even creating them for their own employees. Continue reading

Lean Startups and Passion

It used to be that an entrepreneur came up with an idea that he was passionate about, turned it into a product or service, then went out and tried to sell it. Over time, he would learn whether or not customers would buy it, but the passion kept him going through the ups and downs, twists and turns. To make the business take off required a great deal of creativity, ingenuity, and luck, which helped explain why so many of us used to call entrepreneurship a work of art. Continue reading